I.E. Canada News


Joy Nott to Accompany Governor General on State Visit to Sweden

 Posted on February 17, 2017

OTTAWA, February 16, 2017 — Their Excellencies the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, and Mrs. Sharon Johnston will conduct a State visit to the Kingdom of Sweden from February 19 to 23, 2017.

Parliamentarians and Canadian leaders from academia, innovation, trade and civil society will enhance relations with their counterparts from Sweden. These exchanges will further strengthen Canada’s ties with Sweden, with a particular focus on innovation, trade, and inclusive and sustainable societies.

OFFICIAL DELEGATION

The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, P.C., M.P. Minister of Science

The Honourable Larry Bagnell, P.C., M.P. Member of Parliament for Yukon

The Honourable Thomas Mulcair, P.C., M.P. Leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada

Mr. Bruce Stanton, M.P. Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons

Ms. Heather Grant Ambassador of Canada to the Kingdom of Sweden

Ms. Alexandra Bugailiskis Assistant Deputy Minister, Europe, Middle East and Maghreb, Global Affairs Canada

Mr. Roy Norton Chief of Protocol of Canada

Ms. Patricia Jaton Deputy Secretary to the Governor General of Canada

ACCOMPANYING DELEGATION

The Honourable Perrin Beatty, P.C. President and Chief Executive Officer, The Canadian Chamber of Commerce

His Worship Naheed K. Nenshi Mayor, City of Calgary

Mr. Daniel Alfredsson, M.S.C. Senior Advisor, Ottawa Senators Hockey Club

Dr. Sophie d’Amours Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Université Laval and Canada Research Chair in Planning Sustainable Forest Value Networks

Ms. Nadia Duguay Co-founder, Exeko, and Member, Executive Committee, CCUNESCO

Ms. Alia Hogben, C.M. Executive Director, Canadian Council of Muslim Women

Dr. Art McDonald, C.C., O.Ont., O.N.S. Professor Emeritus, Queen’s University and 2015 Physics Nobel Laureate

Ms. Joy Nott President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Association of Importers and Exporters

Ms. Maatalii Okalik President, National Inuit Youth Council, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK) Ms. Karen Oldfield President and Chief Executive Officer, Halifax Port Authority

Mr. Iain Stewart President, National Research Council of Canada

The biographies of the accompanying delegation will be available online at www.gg.ca.

Members of the public can follow the Governor General’s State visit to the Kingdom of Sweden online at www.gg.ca where speeches, photos and videos will be posted.


I.E.Canada Signs Columbus Statement on U.S.-Canada Relations

 Posted on February 14, 2017

DETROIT, Mich., February 13, 2017As U.S. President Trump and Canada’s Prime Minister Trudeau meet in Washington, D.C. on February 13, 2017, the leading Canada-U.S. business associations, companies, and policy experts have issued the Columbus Statement on U.S.-Canadian Relations that prescribes the general principles that should guide the management of the world’s largest security, trade, and cultural relationship.

The signatories convened in June 2016 on the campus of The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio to discuss the future of the Canada-U.S. relationship in the next U.S. Administration. The result of that June summit, the Columbus Statement on U.S.-Canadian Relations, calls for the respective leaders to address innovation; expanded labor mobility; regulatory alignment; border security; trade and travel facilitation cooperation; enhancing the role of states, provinces, and municipalities, and addressing Canada-U.S. in the global context.

“The United States and Canada are friends because the American and Canadian people are friends. The Columbus Statement comes from the heartland of America and speaks to how stakeholders and citizens of the two countries expect President Trump and Prime Minister Trudeau to lead both countries forward. You cannot make America great again if Canada is not a partner in that success, and when Trudeau says Canada is back, this has to mean that Canada has America’s back at home and around the world.” says Dr. Christopher Sands of Johns Hopkins University, a principal author of the Columbus Statement.

“The Canada-U.S. trade relationship is one of the most well developed and integrated in the world, and as we move into a new era of trade with the possible renegotiation of NAFTA, our aim is to ensure that this partnership between business and policy leaders in both countries continues to be a strong and profitable one,” said Joy Nott, president, I.E.Canada.

Dan Ujczo, an international trade and customs attorney at U.S. firm Dickinson Wright, advises that the “Columbus Statement is a key first step toward establishing the shared priorities of the Canada-U.S. business community. Our ongoing efforts will be to assist our government officials by increasing public awareness of the importance of the Canada-U.S. relationship by having an active network of cross-border groups mobilized throughout the continent.”

Nearly 40 major organizations have signed the Columbus Statement including I.E.Canada, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, the Business Council of Canada and regional Canada-U.S. groups spanning Ohio, New York, Michigan, Arizona, Texas, Florida, North Carolina, and the Pacific Northwest.

The Columbus Statement on U.S.-Canadian Relations is available at http://uscanadasagesummit.com/columbusstatement/index.php.

The U.S.-Canada S.A.G.E. (Strategies, Advocacy, Gateways, Engagement) network was founded by Dickinson Wright PLLC, the Cross-Border Institute at the University of Windsor, and the Center for Canadian Studies at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. More than 300

Canada-U.S trade associations, companies, policy experts and universities participate in S.A.G.E. proceedings. For more information visit http://uscanadasagesummit.com/ or contact Joy Nott at 416-595-5333 or jnott@iecanada.com


Canada Needs Simpler, More Consistent Customs Procedures

 Posted on March 1, 2016

Guest post by Stephen Tapp, Research Director at IRPP, summarizes Joy Nott’s recent commentary, published as part of IRPP’s forthcoming publication, Redesigning Canadian Trade Policies for New Global Realities.

redesigning_canadian_tradepolicyToday, the IRPP released a new commentary, written by Joy Nott (President of the Canadian Importers and Exporters Association — I.E.Canada), as part of our forthcoming research volume, Redesigning Canadian Trade Policies for New Global Realities.

Joy Nott argues that Canada should implement policies and procedures that make it easier for companies to do business in, and with, Canada. As Jacques Roy shows in his chapter on transportation, Canadian businesses generally are not as concerned with clearance times at border crossings, ports and airports as they are with what happens “behind the border.”

Canadian traders want policymakers to pay more attention to the potentially negative impact that import procedures can have after goods have cleared customs. Nott describes this as the “supply chain echo” — whereby imports can be affected by trade policies, procedures and penalties long after goods have cleared customs and crossed borders.

This matters because Canadian firms are increasingly importing in order to export. In Canada’s manufacturing sector, for instance, about one-third of firms are two-way traders — due to the fact that the technologically-advanced goods that we export often require imported inputs.

Much of the thinking in Canadian trade policy, Nott says, mistakenly presumes that the supply chain ends with customs clearance. In reality, the red tape that occurs after firms import is a tangled web of regulations that can feel overwhelming for many Canadian businesses that trade internationally.

Changes to Canada’s policy thinking could significantly improve the global competitiveness of Canadian firms. Policymakers need to be aware of the unintended supply chain echo, and to take steps to mitigate its negative effects on businesses. Nott recommends that Canada’s import and export portfolios be merged under one ministry. And in our approach to designing regulations and reducing red tape, we should not necessarily seek fewer rules, but work toward simpler ones with more consistent outcomes. With these changes, she says that Canadian trade policy would better support our international traders — both exporters and importers — for the highly competitive global business environment of the twenty-first century.

You can read the full commentary here.

 

I.E. Canada Blog


Do You Import Through the Port of Vancouver? You Need to Watch This!

 Posted on October 26, 2016

PODCAST: Member Consultation: Port of Vancouver
New Container Examination Facility Consultation


Major Changes to 2017 Customs Tariff Schedule Published in Canada Gazette: Are Your Imports Impacted?

 Posted on October 11, 2016

On October 5, 2017, the Ministry of Finance released a very long and substantive order amending the 2017 Customs Tariff in Part 2 of the Canada Gazette (SOR/2016-253 September 23, 2016).

We strongly advise you to review this Order to verify whether your imports are impacted.

The Order involves no changes to tariff policy and the amendments are tariff rate neutral; however, the changes are many and could impact importers with customs rulings from CBSA. Importers who are impacted by these changes will also have to start the process of updating tariff databases and contacting the relevant customs brokers to ensure changes are made to your corporate tariff classification profiles. The changes come into effect on January 1, 2017.

The Order is broken down into 7 Parts:

Part 1:
Covers an amendment of the subchapter title XXI to Chapter 29 of Section VI of the Tariff.

Part 2:
Repeals hundreds tariff subheadings and tariff classification numbers impacting 21 Chapters and 52 different tariff headings from the Harmonized System.

Part 3:
Outlines 102 changes to the list of tariff provisions, including but not limited to changes:
– in Chapter notes;
– in subheading notes;
– to descriptions of goods in preambles to tariffs;
– to descriptions of goods in headings;
– and other aspects of the tariff.

Part 4:
Outlines three (3) amendments to the English version of the List of Tariff Provisions.

Part 5:
Outlines twenty-three (23) amendments to the French version of the List of Tariff Provisions.

Part 6:
Outlines seventy-seven (77) new additions to the List of Tariff Provisions which impacts 27 Chapters and 77 tariff headings.

Part 7:
Lists Intermediate and Final Rates for tariff items of the “F” Staging Category of both the Canada- Korea and Canada- Honduras Free Trade Agreements.

Upcoming Activities

« May 2017 » loading...
M T W T F S S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4

Summits & Forums

Find Events

Event Views Navigation

Upcoming Events › Summits & Forums

Events List Navigation

October 2017

I.E.Canada’s 2017 Fall International Trade Summit

October 18 - October 19
Courtyard Brampton Marriott, 90 Biscayne Crescent
Brampton, Ontario Canada
+ Google Map

I.E.Canada’s 2017 Fall International Trade Summit – Brampton October 18th and 19th Is your business located in Ontario? Do you have trade related issues you want to discuss with policy makers? We’ve got you covered. I.E.Canada’s 2017 Fall International…

Find out more »
+ Export Events

Courses

I.E.Canada is committed to supporting its members through training and education. If you are interested in having a training session customized for your company, please contact us to discuss. There are a number of different topics that we are able to provide training for. This valued service is available to I.E.Canada Members only.

We are currently offering the following customized training sessions:

Incoterms – full day course

Exports from Canada 101– full day course

For more information on any one of these sessions, please contact Paulette Niedermier at pniedermier@iecanada.com


Webinars

Jun 08

CUSTOMS VALUATION & TRANSFER PRICING

June 8 at 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm EDT